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Girl Kisses Boy and School Calls Police? Local Drive-By Media Misses the Full Story

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: I want to read to you a headline.  This is from the smokinggun.com.  Snerdley, I want you to listen to this.  "Cops Summoned To Florida Elementary School After Girl Kisses Boy In Phys Ed Class."  Whoa.  Let me read that to you again.  "Cops Summoned To Florida Elementary School After Girl Kisses Boy In Phys Ed Class."  Do you realize how abnormal that sounds given the kind of news that's reported lately?  A girl kissed a boy in a gym, and it's so abnormal the cops were called. 

"A sheriff’s deputy was dispatched last week to a Florida elementary school after a girl kissed a boy during a physical education class.  School brass actually reported the impromptu buss as a possible sex crime, according to the Lee County Sheriff’s Office. The assistant principal of Orange River Elementary School called in the cops after a teacher spotted the smooch Wednesday at the Fort Myers school. In fact, Margaret Ann Haring, 56, initially called child welfare officials, who directed her to contact the sheriff, according to a report.  The kiss apparently occurred after two girls debated over whom the boy liked more.

That’s when one of the girls 'went over and kissed' the boy."

This makes news.  Girl kisses boy in junior high and it stops everything, as though this is the most abnormal thing that has happened in a long time.  A boy kissing a boy, no big deal.  Girl kissing a girl, no big deal.  Teacher kissing a student, nah, no big deal.  Deal with it in time.  But a girl kissed a boy, we will not have that, stop it. (interruption) What?  I'm just telling you here.  Can you believe this?  Something normal happens and we call the cops.  Something abnormal, perverted happens, and, ah, it's ho-hum.  Let's not go there.  We don't really know what's going on, but a girl kisses a boy, and we stop everything, we call the cops, the cops come out, it's a possible sex crime.  A girl kissing a boy.  Who knew such things happened?

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH:  "Cops Summoned To Florida Elementary School After Girl Kisses Boy In Phys Ed Class." That is as normal as things ever used to be, they call the cops for that.  The cops were not called at Penn State.  Remember?  That's what that's all about at Penn State.  The cops were not called at Penn State.  This has been my point all along, thank you, about the elephant in the room that nobody's got the guts to talk about.  Nobody called the cops at Penn State after witnessing numerous rapes of young boys by this assistant coach.  A girl kisses a boy in a middle school in Florida and they drop everything and call the cops, and a 56-year-old teacher calls it a sex crime.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Okay, we're gonna go to the phones; and we have with this a gentleman from Fort Myers who says he's the communications director from Lee County Public School system. This is where the story of the controversial nature comes from: "Cops Called to Florida Grade School After Girl Kisses Boy in Gym." Smoking gun.com has story. Joe is from that school district. He is the spokesman and claims that this is not the whole story. Welcome to the program, sir. Great to have you here.

CALLER: Thanks, Rush. I appreciate the opportunity.

RUSH: Have at it.

CALLER: Well, I have to admit that, like you, when I first heard that initial reason why the police were called I kind of scratched my head and thought to myself, "Something doesn't seem right," because we all know that, especially at the elementary school level, little girls do tend to kiss little boys and vice-versa.

RUSH: Yeah, vice-versa. Let's not leave the vice-versa out.

CALLER: Absolutely. And especially when you get around Valentine's Day, those incidents actually rise a little. So principals are used to that kind of thing happening. What happened in this particular case is when it occurred and the principal, of course, calls the kids to the principal's office -- I'm sure you never got called to the principal's office, but I have.

RUSH: Oh, yeah.

CALLER: I have, and she started talking with one of the little girls to find out why she was acting out this way. Information came to light about another much more serious situation at home that necessitated the police being called. That's what happened. Unfortunately, the local media in their rush to get the story out didn't wait for all of the facts. So what you had is, the rush to be the first to break this unbelievable story of a little girl kissing a little boy, that then of course...

RUSH: Well, you realize that is quite controversial in America.

CALLER: Oh, well...

RUSH: A little girl kissing a boy? That's just not done. We don't hear about that much anymore.

CALLER: (laughing)

RUSH: It doesn't even happen much in movies anymore.

CALLER: But what I wanted is, I wanted you and I wanted your listeners to know that, trust me: Our principals, they're smart enough to know you don't call the cops because a little girl kisses a little boy or vice-versa.

RUSH: Okay. Well, my source for this is the SmokingGun.com.

CALLER: Okay.

RUSH: The story, I pretty much read it in its entirety, says,

"A sheriff's deputy was dispatched last week to a Florida elementary school after a girl kissed a boy during a physical education class. School brass actually reported the impromptu buss as a possible sex crime, according to the Lee County Sheriff's Office. The assistant principal of Orange River Elementary School called in the cops after a teacher spotted the smooch Wednesday at the Fort Myers school. In fact, Margaret Ann Haring, 56, initially called child welfare officials , who directed her to contact the sheriff, according to a report. The kiss apparently occurred after two girls debated over whom the boy liked more. That's when one of the girl 'went over and kissed' the boy. The redacted sheriff's report notes that Haring 'stated there were no new allegations of sexual abuse as far as she knew.' Deputies do not appear to be further probing the preteen kiss." Your point is, is they were called to the principal's office for this and one of the girls told a harrowing story about something going on in her home that shocked everybody, and that's when the cops were called?

CALLER: That's exactly correct -- and, unfortunately, the police report fueled the spreading of misinformation, and I'm... Not to throw the sheriff's department down a flight of stairs, but the information --

RUSH: We'll settle for under the bus.

CALLER: -- or under the bus -- as it were, school bus -- all the information hadn't come to light at that time. And I can tell you that the Department of Children and Families did go back out to the school and has started a separate investigation and has started.

RUSH: Now, how did the police report get it wrong? I mean, this is a major error. How did the police report get things so wrong?

CALLER: I can't answer that question. I'm unfortunately trying to unring that bell.

RUSH: Well, you can't do that.

CALLER: No, unfortunately you can't. The only way I can is put those clarifying information out there to let people know that our principals are not gonna be calling the police because of something so ridiculous of one student kissing another.

RUSH: Well, wait. The way this story is written is that whoever this -- I'm reluctant to mention her name now since you have changed the details of the story, but this 56-year-old teacher called child welfare officials --

CALLER: Yes.

RUSH: -- who directed her to contact the sheriff. The context of the story is that this teacher called in everybody after she witnessed the kiss, long before whatever story one of the girls told in the principal's office.

CALLER: And that's where the error lies, Rush, is the call actually came in after they started talking with the students and found out what was going on off campus.

RUSH: Okay.

CALLER: Which would... I mean...

RUSH: Well, I'm not gonna take you there. No, that's wish. I'm not gonna take you there. That's none of anybody's business.

CALLER: Exactly. Exactly. I appreciate that.

RUSH: I just say there's quite a disparity here, and the story is out there in The Smoking Gun deals with police reports.

CALLER: Correct.

RUSH: Not journalist reports. They deal with actual police reports.

CALLER: Correct, and you're one of a number of folks I'm calling today trying to just get that additional piece of information out there so everybody has the full story.

RUSH: Well, some people are gonna want to know -- you know, if you want them to correct the record on this. Some of them are gonna want to know, "Okay, what really happened?" If you're asking us to retract this, they're going to want to know. You're probably aware that they're gonna start probing. "Okay, what did this little girl talk about that did cause the cops to be called?"

CALLER: Sure.

RUSH: So some people are gonna be after you for that.

CALLER: And if they want to call and talk to us about it, I mean, I can share as much as I can by law but I just want people really to understand that our principals were the crazy enough to just start calling the police willy-nilly.

RUSH: Well, I have to tell you something. I, for one, am relieved. I saw this headline, "Cops Called to Florida Grade School After Girl Kisses Boy in Gym," and, I mean, what more normal thing would happen? This happens. In fact, I feel like applauding it. "Finally there's some normalcy going on in the schools and now they're calling the cops for it?" That was my reaction.

CALLER: Let me tell you, when I got the phone call I almost wrecked my car -- I was on my cell phone -- because I could not believe what I was hearing on the phone.

RUSH: When you got one phone call?

CALLER: As a communications director, when news broke, my office called to tell me what was being reported. I was on my way back to the office from a meeting and when they said, "Media are reporting that the police were called because one little girl kissed a little boy." I was like, "You gotta be kidding me."

RUSH: Is this little girl still in her home?

CALLER: I can't answer the question, but I can tell you that the proper authorities that need to intervene have started that process. Now, what that will result in, whether it's gonna be removal or what if that's information that I will not be privy to because child's not mine --

RUSH: Yeah.

CALLER: -- and that's gonna be private and confidential, but the folks that need to involved are involved. And the bottom line, Rush -- really to all of this -- is having the safety of kids come first. And when you hear something like that, I don't care if you're a principal, a teacher, or somebody walking down the street; you have to act.

RUSH: I got you. All right, thanks much for the call.

 

END TRANSCRIPT

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