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Host's "Concomitant" Pronunciation Freaks Out Freepers

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH:  I understand, ladies and gentlemen, that my occasional usage of the word "concomitant" and "concomitantly" is irritating Freepers at FreeRepublic.com.  "Yes, and if I hear that word and his pronunciation one more time, I will scream!"  I guess some prefer "con-com-i-TANT-ly."  At any rate, I was watching a show, a BBC show -- a fascinating show, by the way.  I hope it's made available in America. It's from the BBC, about Kim Philby.  It's a two-parter. I think it's an hour and 45 minutes each, whatever. It's an hour, hour and a half, maybe it's two hours.

So there are two episodes of a historian/documentarian named Ben Macintyre telling the story of Kim Philby.  He was a Soviet spy in the UK who got away with it for quite a few years.  It's a fascinating story. It occurred informant fifties, sixties, all the way in the eighties. Hhe died sometime in the eighties, but listening to Ben Macintyre narrate this thing, he pronounced some words in ways I have never heard them pronounced.  I had to rewind one thing three or four times to hear it, 'cause dovetailed with what the captioning said.  
We pronounce the word "controversy."  He said it "con-TRO-ve-see," as in the "controversy that Philby found himself in the midst of..." I said, "Wait.  What is that?"  It's just like in the old NBC days. I'm talking about the David Sarnoff days. When you wanted to try out to be a staff announcer at NBC, they gave you a pronunciation test, and if they gave you the word c-o-n-s-u-m-m-a-t-e, most people pronounce that "consummate."  Ah, ah, ah!  If you were taking the old NBC staff announcer test, if you didn't pronounce it "con-SUM-it," you failed.  "Con-SUM-it" was the way it was pronounced then.  
"Con-TRO-ve-see " is the way the Brits, apparently some of them, pronounce "controversy." There's "ad-VERT-tis-ment," and "advert" is the British word for commercial or spot.  The British say everything wrong, but now people are all over me for "concomitantly" and the way I'm pronouncing it. They want "con-com-i-TANT-ly." That's the way some people want me to pronounce it.  Screw all of you! You know what the word is.  The thing is, when I started using it, everybody here thought I had made up a word.  You Freepers at least know it's a word. (laughing) Now the staff's saying, "Gee, thanks, for making us look like idiots." 
I'm just joking here, but the Freepers are really upset here, apparently, by the way I'm pronouncing it. 

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH:  If you can, go back, find an old dictionary, and look up the original pronunciation the word "espionage."  It used to be "es-PI-on-age."  Henry Cabot Lodge even once pronounced it that way, "es-PI-on-age," to go along with "con-com-i-TANT."  Is that better, folks?  "con-com-i-TANT-ly"?

END TRANSCRIPT

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