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Rush Revere and Orwell's Animal Farm

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH:  This is Melissa in Omaha.  Welcome to the program.  Great to have you here.  Hi.

CALLER:  It is such a honor, Mr. Limbaugh, to talk to you.  I've been listening to you since I was about 12 years old.

RUSH:  Thank you very much.  I appreciate that.

CALLER:  The reason I'm calling is it seems to me that a lot of people are confused with Marxism, communism, liberalism, and socialism, and how they all work together and what they are.  I think the easiest way for me to understand it when I was learning in school was to read Animal Farm by George Orwell.  That puts it in very easy terms to understand and it shows how it trickles down and affects everybody.  Not everybody is equal in a Marxist, socialistic society, and it puts it in kind of a cartoon way to see that.

RUSH:  You liked Animal Farm better than 1984?

CALLER:  1984 was a little hard for me to read.

RUSH:  Oh, really?

CALLER:  I had a little difficulty getting through it, to be honest.

RUSH:  It's amazing.  Orwell is such a celebrated guy, and what he wrote, in many cases, was an indictment of the left and yet they seldom trash the guy, at least not that I've seen.  Animal Farm, that's not a bad recommendation, I have to hand it to you, not a bad recommendation.  

CALLER:  My kids are seven years old, I have a set of twins. And what's really interesting in our household is I'm a very conservative Republican, and my husband's a Democrat liberal.  And so we have some very interesting discussions in our household, and what's really interesting is my seven year old son tends to lean towards my side of thinking, and my daughter just doesn't pay attention. But the one thing that they have paid attention to is the reading of Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims, and I'm so grateful that someone --

RUSH:  You're kidding?  Both of them are paying attention to that?

CALLER:  Yes, they absolutely love it.  They both find it very fascinating that it was actually a real time and place. That was very important for me to make them understand, that everything that was happening was real time and place and that even though Rush Revere and Liberty were fictional characters, everybody else was not.

RUSH:  Well, God bless you.  That is perfect.  Thank you very much.

CALLER:  So we do a lot of reading in our house, and I think it's written very well.  I'm looking at getting Rush Revere and the First Patriots. They asked if there were any more books out and I said, "Yeah, one just came out."  So we're looking at getting that, and they are absolutely enthralled.

RUSH:  Let me tell you about that one.  In that one, you know, in Rush Revere and the First Patriots, exactly why you like Animal Farm is a key ingredient in the second one.  Not in the political sense, but Rush Revere finds his way to George III's palace and asks him why in the world are you treating the American colonists this way?  It was my attempt to explain to young readers how totalitarianism, authoritarianism, how it works, who's behind it, why they do it. How it affects people in a way that, you know, eight-10, seven-10, 12-year-old kids could understand and maybe relate to today as they get older.  That was fun to write, but I've gotta ask you, it sounds like Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims is uniting your family, but you didn't mention your husband on this.  Where does your husband come down on the kids reading the book?

           

CALLER:  He's very open.  He wants them to be able to form their own opinions.  We present them with the information and then they're allowed to form their own opinions based on the information presented.

RUSH:  Well, that's good.

CALLER:  Yeah.

RUSH:  That is good.

CALLER:  He and I don't always see eye-to-eye, I have to tell you.  We have some very interesting discussions in our house.

RUSH:  Well, I wouldn't think so, if he's a liberal and you're a conservative, I would think that --

CALLER:  Yes.

RUSH:  -- you wouldn't see eye-to-eye on a lot, politically.

CALLER:  Yes.

RUSH:  What's cool is your daughter, who you say is not paying attention, is because of this book.

CALLER:  Yes.  Yes.  It actually caught her interest.  It's something that caught her interest.  The talking horse, Liberty, is actually what brought her into the book and she was actually able to comprehend what we were talking about.

RUSH:  Hallelujah.  That's great.

CALLER:  So it's been great.

RUSH:  You know, you must allow me to send you the Rush Revere and the First Patriots.  I know you're not angling for a freebie, I can hear it in your voice.

CALLER:  No, I'm really, really not.  I wanted you to understand how much --

RUSH:  I know you're not --

CALLER:  -- we really appreciate the books.

RUSH:  I would love to send it and hope your husband opens it when it arrives.

CALLER:  That would be great.  We would totally enjoy that.

RUSH:  I'll throw in audio versions, unabridged, read by me, of both.  It is another way to experience the books after having read them.  But that's awesome.  That's terrific. thank you very much, Melissa, and all the best to you.  Now, don't hang up, 'cause Mr. Snerdley needs to get an address from you so we can send the stuff out to you as quickly as we can get to it.  

END TRANSCRIPT

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