×

Rush Limbaugh

For a better experience,
download and use our app!

The Rush Limbaugh Show Main Menu




RUSH: We talked about the riots yesterday in Atlanta. Here’s a sound bite. NBC Nightly News last night, the correspondent Ron Mott reporting on thousands of people lining up for public housing vouchers in Atlanta.

MOTT: The first thought that I had when we pulled up on the scene here was whether we were in America, and I have to be very careful as a reporter not to overstep my bounds but this was a very disgusting scene that we saw here in metro Atlanta today. Dozens upon dozens of people passing out from the heat, standing in the heat just to get an application to apply for public housing here in metro Atlanta. This does not guarantee them a place to live. In fact, they had so many applications go out today, 13,000 applications, there are exactly zero public housing units, zero subsidized housing units available in East Point, Georgia. A lot of these folks will never get off that wait list.

RUSH: Never get off that wait list. This reporter couldn’t believe he was seeing this happening in the United States of America. He’s seeing it happen in Obamaville. It is happening in Obamaville. Barack ‘Hoover’ Obama. Thirteen thousand people trying to just get an application to just apply? And Obama tells us the Summer of Recovery, the worst is behind us, or worse, that Bush is to blame? And did you notice the reporter says, ‘I have to be very careful as a reporter not to overstep my bounds.’ What the hell does that mean? What he means is he’s gotta be very careful he doesn’t tell the real big truth here. Overstepping his bounds means telling the deep, dark truth about this circumstance and why it exists. Remember, NBC is the network of Obama.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Back to Atlanta here, I don’t know if you saw this, but the guy shooting the video from the helicopter up there looking down on this scene called it Uganda. Probably accidentally, called it Uganda. Therefore this reporter, Ron Mott, I will guarantee you, this reporter had to be careful because the Atlanta story is a pretty good example of how the who, what, where, and why is too politically incorrect to be told. Try answering those questions. If you doubt me, this Atlanta story, try answering those questions: who, what, when, where, why at NBC and see if you still have a job. When the guy is up in the helicopter looking down and calls it Uganda? And I’m not saying they did it on purpose, accidental.

USA Today: ‘Feds Rethink Policies that Encourage Home Ownership.’ Yeah, right, I’m sure after this riot in Atlanta yesterday. But the thing is they told us it was a right. All of these years they’ve been telling us home ownership is a right, so much of a right that we got the subprime mortgage crisis, which is the foundation of this whole disaster, by the way. ‘Just how much should Uncle Sam do to help Americans buy their own homes? For 70 years — and for the last 15 in particular –‘ and that’s subprime, folks, the last 15 is subprime ‘the answer has been: Whatever it takes,’ to help Americans buy their homes. ‘Now, policymakers are pausing to reconsider. In the next few months, they’ll weigh whether there can be too much of a good thing when it comes to helping families finance the American Dream.’ Too much of a good thing. Conservatives have been telling them exactly this for 70 years.

”This process of figuring out the government’s role is going to involve some hard choices,’ says Alyssa Katz, author of Our Lot: How Real Estate Came to Own Us. … Using guarantees and tax breaks, the government pushed homeownership past 69% in 2004. Then it all came crashing down.’ Even Barney Frank in 2009, April, said the push for home ownership was probably a mistake. Well, thanks, after telling everybody, particularly the last 15 years, Community Redevelopment Act, the last 15 years ‘it’s a right, home ownership is a right.’ And now they’re rethinking policies that encourage it. So the people who have destroyed the market, the people who have caused the whole concept of home values being underwater, now say, ‘Maybe we ought to reexamine this.’ No, we need to get rid of you, which, the first step of that’s going to happen starting in November.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Scott in Bethesda, Maryland, as we go back to the phones, you’re next on the Rush Limbaugh program. Hello, sir.

CALLER: Greetings from the socialist state of Maryland.

RUSH: Thank you, sir.

CALLER: I don’t get to listen to you as much as I’d like to. Long ago when I first started listening you used to irritate the heck out of me because everything you said made such sense I couldn’t understand why anybody would do it any other way.

RUSH: You know, I ask myself the same thing. For 22 years, how can anybody disagree with anything that I say? You know, if I allowed myself to dwell on that I could get really frustrated.

CALLER: Don’t ever retire. Take all your money that you make one day and counteract the Nobel Prizes with the Limbaugh Prizes one day.

RUSH: (laughing)

CALLER: The reason for the call is I couldn’t help not recall a piece from years ago when you were talking about the reporter describing the Atlanta scene like Uganda. And I’m not saying that that reporter did anything wrong, but it reminded me of that poor college student that was telling the girl making noise outside his dorm room to shut up and called her a water buffalo and they almost kicked him out of school for being a racist.

RUSH: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Where is that? Where did that happen? Was that Princeton?

CALLER: I cannot remember. I know it was years ago.

RUSH: I remember, in fact, sometime in the nineties — was it an Asian kid?

CALLER: I think it was a white kid and he called her a water buffalo, had nothing to do her race but maybe more to do with her size, and then all of a sudden it becomes racist and they want to kick him out of school.

RUSH: I remember that. Yeah, his name was Jacobowitz, a Jewish guy, that’s what it was, Eden Jacobowitz. And I think we even had this guy on the program at one time. Yeah, yeah, it seems like it was only yesterday. He called this woman a water buffalo because she was making noise and he was trying to study.

CALLER: Hm-hm.

RUSH: And he was disciplined. Exactly right. So you’re saying that the guy in the helicopter reporting over the riots in Atlanta saying it looked like Uganda needs to be disciplined?

CALLER: I’m not saying he needs to be disciplined and I’m not saying he did anything wrong, but are they asking him the questions that —

RUSH: Wait a minute.

CALLER: — they asked this poor student.

RUSH: Wait a minute. We’ve got a reporter in a helicopter flying over a riot in Atlanta, people signing up for vouchers to apply for housing, and the reporter says it looks like Uganda, and you don’t think he did anything wrong.

CALLER: I like to believe in the good in people.

RUSH: Believe in the what in people?

CALLER: I like to believe in the good in people. I don’t think he necessarily did anything wrong. He was describing —

RUSH: Wait a second. If somebody thinks it is wrong, why would it be wrong? What is wrong to say something looks like Uganda? We’d have to know what Uganda looks like, wouldn’t we? And we know what Uganda looks like, we know what the population looks like. So is it racist to say that what’s happening in Atlanta looked like Uganda or is it what they do in Uganda, not how they look but what they do in Uganda? And is it therefore prejudiced to start assuming what they do? Do they riot in Uganda every day? Help me out here, Snerdley. Oh. Oh. It could be racialist, not racist, it could be racialist to be in a helicopter over riots in Atlanta and to say it looks like Uganda. I mean, really, what does Uganda look like? And does it mean what they look like or what they’re doing? I mean since Idi Amin Dada went into exile I don’t know what they do in Uganda. Didn’t Al-Qaeda wipe out some people in Uganda recently? Yeah. He couldn’t have meant that because nobody got wiped out. I mean people were fainting from the heat and so forth. But I think it is an interesting thing. Atlanta looks like Uganda. What’s wrong with Uganda? There has to be something wrong with Uganda if you’re going to get in trouble for saying — (interruption) I think it was a local TV report. Might have been network, I’m not sure which. But it doesn’t matter.

If you’re going to say that whatever was going on in Atlanta looked like Uganda, it was a local reporter, there’s gotta be something wrong about Uganda, right? In which case we have to know, what is it about Uganda that’s wrong, what’s the big deal about saying something looks like Uganda? It’s a high helicopter shot, like they show a shot of a big rally on the mall in Washington or whatever, but this was Atlanta, people were lining up to get vouchers to get subsidies. (interruption) Well, that’s what I’m saying. Okay, Snerdley, I know, it looked like an out-of-control riot, it was. That’s how it was reported. It looked like an out-of-control riot. So you got a guy in the helicopter saying it looks like Uganda. So are there riots every day in Uganda, out-of-control riots? If there are, we don’t hear about them.

What I’m trying to bore in on here is somebody finds that obviously racist, or racialist, or what have you. And the reporter, the NBC reporter said, ‘I have to be really careful here, I can’t overstep my journalistic bounds.’ What’s that? Well, that means I can’t do the who, what, when, where, and why because if I do that I’m going to be in deep doo-doo. He didn’t say it didn’t look like America. He said, ‘I can’t believe this is happening in America.’ Let’s go get the sound bite. Now, this is not the sound bite where the guy mentions Uganda. It’s number seven. This is last night on the NBC Nightly News and here’s Ron Mott’s report on thousands of people lined up for public housing vouchers in Atlanta.

MOTT: The first thought that I had when we pulled up on the scene here was whether we were in America, and I have to be very careful as a reporter not to overstep my bounds, but this was a very disgusting scene that we saw here in metro Atlanta today. Dozens upon dozens of people passing out from the heat, standing in the heat just to get an application to apply for public housing here in metro Atlanta. This does not guarantee them a place to live. In fact, they had so many applications go out today, 13,000 applications, there are exactly zero public housing units, zero subsidized housing units available in East Point, Georgia. A lot of these folks will never get off that wait list.

RUSH: Maybe that’s what the guy meant because there’s no public housing in Uganda, either. So do I hear this right, this guy is reporting 13,000 people signed up for something that doesn’t exist, there isn’t any, yet they’re giving out vouchers for it. And he says, ‘I have to be very careful as a reporter not to overstep my bounds.’ I’m sure what he’s talking about is the who, what, when, where, and why. I can’t really answer those questions. That’s what they teach you in J-school, the who, what, when, where, and why, and the answer is always, ‘Republicans suck.’ But in this case he couldn’t find a Republican. That’s what he means.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This