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The NAALCP, Explained

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Let's grab call on line one right now 'cause I want to use this to segue into the next audio sound bite from the Reverend Jackson. This is Larry in Winter Park, Florida. Larry, welcome to the Rush Limbaugh program. Hi.

CALLER: Good afternoon, Mr. Limbaugh. First-time caller, occasional listener.

RUSH: Well, thank you.

CALLER: I first have a question to you not pertaining to your show but basically something I heard a little earlier: The NAALCP. I was very curious about that and I was just wondering if you can fill me in on exactly what does that means.

RUSH: Yeah. It's the National Association for the Advancement of Liberal Colored People.

CALLER: Okay. Can you be a little bit more specific?

RUSH: You want more specificity? Okay. The National Association for the Advancement of Liberal Colored People, for example, is terribly opposed to Justice Clarence Thomas, who is -- um, uh -- a "colored person."

CALLER: African-American. Okay. Go ahead.

RUSH: African-American? Well, I agree but they all themselves the National Association for the Advancement of "Colored" People. So I was trying to be consistent.

CALLER: That's all colors, Rush. You do know that. That means all colors, but go ahead. I didn't mean to interrupt you. Go ahead.

RUSH: Oh, you mean...? I didn't know this. The National Association for the Advancement of Liberal Colored People is for all "peoples of color"?

CALLER: No, no, no, the part "of color" means all people of color.

RUSH: Well, you mean when they were chartered back in 1909 that they were including Asians and Hispanics and all peoples of color when they were first chartered?

CALLER: I wasn't there back then, back in the day, but --

RUSH: You know the vast majority of the people that founded the NAALCP were white.

CALLER: Really?

RUSH: Oh, yeah. It's not arguable.

CALLER: I did not know that.

RUSH: I mean, facts are facts and sometimes are disappointing things, but the vast majority of the founders of the NAALCP were white. They were Caucasian.

CALLER: That's a color. All right. Well, Mr. Limbaugh, thank you very much. You've answered my question.

RUSH: You bet. I'm happy to. Do you have any more? I'm on a roll here. Do you have any more questions? I love answering questions! I love it.

CALLER: You crack me up, Mr. Limbaugh, but thanks very much. (chuckling) Have a good day, sir.

RUSH: Larry, let me ask you a question before you go.

CALLER: All right.

RUSH: Has the NAALCP ever supported a conservative candidate for office, black or white?

CALLER: I really wouldn't know that offhand.

RUSH: Well, I do, and the answer is no, and that's why I put the "L" in there, to be specific about who they are: The National Association for the Advancement of Liberal Colored People. And if you want say liberal Mexico City and liberal Hispanics and liberal Chinese and Japanese, fine. You can include them in there, too, but they gotta be liberal for that organization to support 'em. You can be African-American and conservative and they will work to defeat you.

CALLER: Hmm. Interesting.

RUSH: So they're not for the advancement of "colored people." They are for the advancement of liberals.

CALLER: So hence that's where you get the liberals. Okay, I got you, Mr. Limbaugh.

RUSH: Yeah. That's where I get the liberal. That's why I put the "L" in NAALCP.

CALLER: Got it. Sir, thank you very much.

RUSH: You bet. Happy to help. See? Just proves: If there's something you don't understand, ask it. There's no such thing as a dumb question. He didn't know what it stood for; now he does. He didn't know why I put that in there. Now he does. Speaking of which, one of the revered and august members of the NAALCP is the well known Reverend Jackson who, on CNN's Newsroom Saturday was interviewed by T.J. Holmes. And T.J. Holmes said, "The title of the song is Lift Every Voice and Sing. It's been around since 1900. But when you label something a 'black national anthem,' then in fact you're doing something that's discriminatory and divisive some say. Do you agree with that?" This is all about the Reverend Jackson wants a black national anthem.

JACKSON: To me it does not stand to reason. I mean, songs rooted in our unique slavery experience, our unique Jim Crow experience, and in a song of as if (sic) We Shall Overcome. "God of our weary years, God of our silent tears, Thou who has brought us thus far on the way," what are we describing, "who's been brought safely along the way" except the black experience? I was talking with a group this week of Latino leaders who are concerned that they are trying to remove ethnic studies in Arizona. The attempt to excerpt (sic) ethnic studies in school, the attempt to excerpt the tape that drew about the Shirley Sherrod challenge this week --

HOLMES: Mmm-hmm.

JACKSON -- we should not excerpt history; we should include history, and it is the richness... The multiculturalism is the richness and the genius of American experience.

RUSH: He misspoke there. He keeps using "excerpt," when he meant "exclude." But there you have it: The Reverend Jackson wants a black national anthem. "God of our weary years, God of our silent tears, Thou who has brought us thus far on the way," I'm reminded of Mrs. Clinton, at the ceremony commemorating Selma. (screeching impression), "I ain't no ways tiiiiiired," she said. Obama also showed up at that celebration and in the "Negro dialect" said it some of it made him who he is but just yesterday Maureen Dowd in the New York Times said he's not black enough, and they don't have enough real black people in the administration. Now, I know all this is funny, but it's also ludicrous. We're supposed to be past all of this with the election of Obama. We're supposed to be unified and happy.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: So, ladies and gentlemen, the Reverend Jackson wants a black national anthem. I've been thinking about this during the commercial break. This is not a black national anthem, certainly not, but we do have a song that might suffice as a national anthem for the Reverend Jackson, Diana Ross and the Supremes.

(Love Child by the Supremes)

RUSH: All right, that makes the point, the Reverend Jackson national anthem: Diana Ross and the Supremes, Love Child.

END TRANSCRIPT

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