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The Miss Low-Info USA Pageant

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Last night was the Miss USA Pageant, and it was on in our house. (interruption) I didn't say I watched it.  I said it was on.  I heard it.  I was at my desk doing show prep, I heard it, and we got a sound bite from Miss Alabama. (interruption) I don't think we have a Miss Utah.  What, you like Miss Utah? 

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Last night, the 2013 Miss USA competition.  This is Trump's deal.  Do you know where they're gonna do Miss Universe?  Trump came out there last night and said they're gonna do Miss Universe, which he also owns, at some city hall in Russia.  I kid you not.  Kathryn asked, "Were they serious about that?" I was listening while I was doing show prep. "No, no, it's serious."  Miss Alabama, Mary Margaret McCord, is being questioned.  The judge, in this case, the actress Wendie Malick, said to Miss Alabama, Mary Margaret McCord, "Government tracking of phone records has been in the news lately.  Is this an invasion of privacy, or is it necessary to keep our country safe?  Why or why not?"

Here is the answer from Mary Margaret McCord...

MCCORD:  I think the society that we live in today, it's sad that if we go to the movies or to the airport or even to the mall, that we have to worry about our safety. So I would rather someone track my telephone messages and feel safe wherever I go, than feel like they're encroaching on my privacy.

AUDIENCE: (wild applause)

MALICK:  Thank you.  Thank you, Alabama.

RUSH:  And the audience, which was at the Planet Hollywood arena  -- which is where I judge a Miss America Pageant some years ago. The audience at the Planet Hollywood arena, as you heard there, went nuts cheering their support for the notion that Miss Alabama would rather have "someone," government somewhere, "track her phone messages" because that means that she would "feel safe" wherever she went rather than feeling as though her privacy was being encroached on. (interruption)  No, not... You're using the wrong term. You're using the wrong term. 

It's the low-information population there, Snerdley. 

That's what that is.  I mean, hello?

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Now, Mary Margaret McCord, Miss Alabama, after I played this sound bite, you shoulda seen on the staff the other side of the glass.  They were shocked.  They couldn't believe it. Listen to it again.  Mary Margaret McCord from Alabama, government tracking of phone records in the news lately, is this an invasion of privacy or is it necessary to stay safe?  Why or why not? 

MCCORD:  I think the society that we live in today, it's sad that if we go to the movies or to the airport or even to the mall, that we have to worry about our safety. So I would rather someone track my telephone messages and feel safe wherever I go, than feel like they're encroaching on my privacy.

RUSH:  Now, I imagine a number of you are saying, "What in the world."  Stop and think of something here.  Miss Alabama is in her early twenties, and the odds are that her educational experience has included years and years of how wonderful the government is.  She doesn't distrust it, particularly with Obama.  Obama loves everybody. Obama is gonna keep people safe. Obama cares.  It makes total sense to me.  And then Snerdley said, "Do you realize somebody is gonna marry her and they're gonna have kids and then where are we?"  I said, "Well, maybe, but the guy that marries her is not gonna be asking her these kinds of questions, Snerdley, so it doesn't matter."  And whatever questions he asks, whatever she says, he's gonna agree with anyway.  That's just the way of the world.

There was another contestant, Miss Utah, whose name is Marissa Powell. And one of the judges was NeNe Leakes, and NeNe Leakes asks Miss Utah, Marissa Powell, this question:  "A recent report shows that in 40 percent of American families with children, women are the primary earners, yet they continue to earn less than men. What does it say about society?"

And Marissa Powell said, "I think we can relate this back to education, and how we are continuing to try to strive . . . to . . ." and then she paused, and people started getting nervous because she seemed lost.  She seemed to be in the middle of what some people know as a brain freeze.  And finally she got herself back together, and then she continued speaking.  She said, "We have to strive to figure out how to create jobs right now. That is the biggest problem and I think, especially the men are ... seen as the leaders of this, and so we need to see how to … create education better.  So that we can solve this problem. Thank you." 

And the audience cheered and thought it was a wonderful thing, a beautiful thing 'cause we do need to create education better so that we can solve the problem, because, for men, as seen are the leaders of this.  So that the highlights of the Miss USA. 

She came in third place.  Do you think it's 'cause of this answer?  I've been a judge of these things.  Do you know how much weight this counts for?  It isn't much.  I forget the exact percentage, the swimsuit, the evening gown, the interview, it's not that much.

(interruption)

Are you gonna get lost in this?  We are looking at her brain here, that's what we're examining here, Snerdley.  We are looking at and examining her brain.  I haven't described -- we are appreciating the brain.  I haven't described her appearance to you once yet.  I'm doing exactly what we're supposed to do.  We're talking about her brain and how she thinks we need to create education better.  Hey, you know what?  You need to lighten up.  She cares.  At least she cares.  Okay.

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: We have now Marissa Powell, Miss Utah from the Miss USA competition last night.  The actress NeNe Leakes said, "A recent report shows that in 40% of American families with children, women are the primary earners, yet they continue to earn less than men.  What does this say about our society?"

POWELL:  I think we can relate in back to education and how we are continuing to try to strive to... (long pause)

AUDIENCE: WOOOOOO!

POWELL: ...figure out how to create jobs right now.  That is the biggest problem, and I think especially the men are seen as (clicks tongue) the leaders of this, and so we need to try to figure out how to create education better so that we can solve this problem.  Thank you.

RUSH:  Yeah! Right on! (clapping) Right on.  "Men are seen as the leaders in this, and so we need to figure out how to create education better..." 

END TRANSCRIPT

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