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Washington Doesn't Have the Answers to Our Cultural Problems

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: We go to Traverse City, Michigan.  This is Brenda.  Thank you for calling and for waiting and being patient.  Hi.

CALLER:  Hi, Rush.  Thank you for taking my call.

RUSH:  You bet.

CALLER:  I wanted to discuss the Elliot Rodger situation, and I simply want to point out that something I think the liberal media will happily avoid, and that is that this is what happens when children are not parented.  I think his parents should be held responsible.  Obviously he's responsible for what he did, but his parents are also responsible because I think he was neglected, to say the least.  I think he was probably also abused.  And, you know, I think that they just happily continued on with their lives.

RUSH:  What do you mean, abused?  What are you thinking happened to him?

CALLER:  I scanned over his manifest last evening, and one incident really stood out.  When he entered his father's home to get a drink of water, his stepmother ordered him to exit and to ring the doorbell.  He went ahead and started to drink his water, evidently, and she smashed the glass out of his hand and it shattered on the floor.  The father appeared when he heard the glass shattering, and he ordered him out of the house.  Evidently he was supposed to ring the doorbell and enter properly. I mean, that's ridiculous.

RUSH:  Well that sounds like the father afraid of the mother.

CALLER:  Exactly, and that's the power play that goes on in this country.  We have kids getting shipped off to day care.  We have kids getting --

RUSH:  Well, you know, there have been incidents like this that have come up, Brenda, and every time -- not every time, but oftentimes somebody will suggest, "The parents played a role here.  We really need to consider how the child was raised and maybe the parents..." A lot of times when that happens, people say, "Wait a minute. You can't start getting off on that tangent of the parents are responsible or share some of the blame 'cause the kid did what he did."  

BREAK TRANSCRIPT

RUSH:  I made a slight error, ladies and gentlemen.  It was not Elliot Rodger's father but one of the victim's fathers who said, "When are the politicians gonna do something about this?" That means, "When are the politicians gonna get rid of the guns?"  Elliot Rodger's father, I don't know that he's spoken publicly about the incident, but he has blamed the NRA and lack of gun control laws before.

However there aren't any existing or proposed gun control laws that would have stopped Elliot Rodger.  If I'm not mistaken... I hope I'm not committing a minor error again, but I think this kid passed three background checks, one for each gun that he bought.  He didn't need any large-capacity magazines, which are already illegal in California.  The family had called the cops on their son but it was too late.

They went to his apartment and questioned him, but it went nowhere.  But still, this reflex to turn to politicians in Washington? Now, I understand the utter emptiness, sadness, rage, anger that parents in a situation like this have.  I guess, you know, I understand human nature and wanting to turn to the source of all authority.  But it isn't me.  "When is the government gonna...?"

It's just the opposite.  I don't view it that way.

There's nothing in my life I want to turn over to the government, that I think they can do better than I can do myself, other than the US military.  Of course, I don't want to build my own roads and stuff like that. Obviously. But I'm talking about just the personal aspects of life and having some central authority that you think is going to end sadness, that can deal with it?  Let's face it, folks: It is a creeping problem.  We've got dingbats calling 911 when McDonald's doesn't have any McNuggets, and some of them think they're calling Washington.  It's an amazing thing. 

Here's Dave in Indianapolis.  Hi, Dave.  Glad you called, sir.  Welcome to the EIB Network.  Hi.

CALLER: (garbled) Rush, it's a real pleasure to talk to you.  Thank you for taking my call.  I think I've got a thread that will run through the entirety of what you've been talking about since the start of the show, multiple issues.

RUSH:  Okay.

CALLER:  I believe a primary responsibility of parenting, a foundational responsibility, is for the parents of a child to be the restraint, to be the molders of that child's mind in what's right and what's wrong and to be there in the way of them harming others and harming themselves, and to train them, raise them up in how they are supposed to behave to understand right and wrong and to be in the way until that child grows to the point of being a responsible adult.

RUSH:  Don't you understand that, in the modern era, what you just described equals retarding your child's growth? (angrily) "You are limiting your child's experiences and exposure to opportunity and life as it really exists in this country!  You can't stop them from experiencing the excrement as much as they want.  It's out there, and it's better that they find it.  You can't do all that!"

CALLER: Yes, it's my responsibility to do so, and I think one of the key problems that we have in society is the undermining and destruction and the emasculation of males, the destruction of the family, and in particular targeting the father in the proper role a father's supposed to have.  I'm not suggesting that a child can't not turn out correctly.  If there are problems with the family, I understand completely it does happen. 

RUSH:  Don't forget, now --

CALLER:  But the proper --

RUSH:  In this case, don't forget that this kid's parents, they knew there was something wrong.  I don't know. They said... (interruption)  Yeah, he was seeing a therapist since age eight. But, you know, there are people who think that is its own problem, all these therapy babies. What are they told in therapy?  They're told they're invincible. They're told their self-esteem is paramount, that they have a right to love themselves and to put themselves first and to be concerned about themselves and so forth.

CALLER:  And I believe a study was done some years ago, and they were evaluating where one could find some of the highest tested levels of self-esteem.  Do you remember that study?

RUSH:  Yeah. I do remember that.  Absolutely I do remember that.

CALLER:  Do you know where they found the highest levels of self-esteem? Prison.  They found it in prison.  I think it is the entitlement mentality.  I think it is the lack of personal initiative and responsibility, the lack of personal accountability that is not taught to children today that is the reason for the man babies that we've got in our society.

RUSH:  Okay.

CALLER:  I mean, not everybody's going to go into a school and do what, God forbid, happened in Sandy Hook.  I grieve for those patients.  But that family was a train wreck.  I think when you combine someone who has some problematic wiring with a dysfunctional family, you end up with what happened in California.

RUSH:  Let me ask you a question about something you said about the emasculation of males, because there are a lot of people who would think you're on to something there.  One of the e tenets of modern-era feminism -- which, you know, you trace back to the early seventies -- is that men are predators, that men are beasts. Look at the hashtags on Twitter today.  Not all men are like this guy, they say, but women face this threat from men every day of their lives. It is a Twitter hashtag. It already has a million whatevers, and it's growing. 

CALLER:  I would say that that is a huge problem, and it is a symptom.  I think the root cause goes back to men, the emasculation of them, and the lack of teaching boundaries and proper treatment of women and proper respect for women, from the father and mother.

RUSH:  Well, perhaps.  Look, a lot of people agree with you.  For example I have a little story that I found, of all places, on one of my tech blogs yesterday.  Listen to this. "Study Finds Lonely Women Use Facebook All the Time -- Those who over-share on Facebook may be dissatisfied with real life. According to a new study from Charles Sturt University in New South Wales, Australia, women who consider themselves to be lonely or depressed are more willing to disclose information through the social network.

"The study, titled 'Self-disclosure on Facebook among female users and its relationship to feelings of loneliness,' found that 79% of users who admit to being 'lonely' disclosed personal information, like their favorite books and movies on Facebook. The figure is higher compared to 65% of other users.  According to Market Watch, 98% of lonely Facebook users shared their relationship status publicly, as opposed to restricting the information to friends."

Ninety-eight percent!

Practically all of the women on Facebook who considered themselves unhappy are just volunteering every piece of data about themselves. 

Modern-era feminism has been a poison in many ways.  You look at The Vagina Monologues, renowned Broadway play, and it's all rooted in the predatory, brutish potential of men. And remember the fake survey that the media trumpeted and everybody believed for a short period of time, that Super Bowl Sunday saw the most violence against women of any day of the year.  And that's when men are doing what?  Sitting there getting drunk, eating snacks, drinking beer, watching the now brutal game of football and, when things didn't go right, taking it out on their long-suffering, poor victim wives.  And it turned out to be a totally bogus survey, just totally made up, by a group of people with connections to some feminist fundraising outfit. 

And so the chickification of the culture, there's no question it's happening.  In fact, I read -- I don't know how much of this is true, there's so much out there -- I read that one of the reasons that Pinch Sulzberger got rid of Jill Abramson was that she was hiring women in every key editor, managerial position she could.  She was slowly but surely getting rid of all the men in the department.  I can't remember where I read that.  (interruption)  Right, right, it was the New York Times, that's exactly right, that's where it was.  Anyway, I appreciate the call, Dave.  

END TRANSCRIPT

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